G6 Week 12 – S2

Last week in science!

Monday, April 12th

Today in science: On his first day back in three weeks, Dr. M fielded plenty of questions pertaining to his whereabouts before then reviewing some things that had happened since he was last at school. As he catches up on checking in and evaluating the work students submitted during his absence, Dr. M asked students to pay special attention to any Veracross notifications they receive from him this week about past work/assignments.

Homework: There is no required homework tonight, although some students may need to still send Dr. M their completed coding Trinkets (of atoms and molecules) if they haven’t do so already.

Tuesday, April 13th

Today in science: After mapping what scientists sometimes refer to as the “main/major scientific disciplines” on the whiteboard, Dr. M introduced our new unit–Forces & Motion–by asking students to provide their answers on a piece of scrap paper to six questions recorded in the Notes portal. When finished, students were asked to record scientific definitions for both force and motion on the back of their paper. Then, when looking at an image of a downhill skier, students were then asked to briefly think about both the forces (acting upon the skier) and the motion (of the skier).

Homework: There is no required homework tonight, although some students may need to still send Dr. M their completed coding Trinkets (of atoms and molecules) if they haven’t do so already.

Thursday, April 15th

Today in science: After briefly learning about Newton’s first two laws of motion and recording them in their Lab Notebooks, students were then given the remaining class time to construct the LEGO ski slope (pp. 24-55). This ski slope will be used for experiments to illustrate both Newton’s 1st & 2nd laws of motion during the next 2-3 class periods.

Homework:

Friday, April 16th

Today in science: After creating a data table in their Lab Notebook, students were asked to set up their experiment space on a lab bench by marking it with tape (or some other non-permanent means). Students then performed their first set of trials with the ski slope set at both 20 and 30 degrees. In an attempt to attain more accurate/reliable scientific results, students were asked to 1) run pre-trials to determine the best body position for their skier, 2) record the final body position of their skier in their Lab Notebook, 3) agree, as a class, as to where the total distance travelled mark will be measured for both skiers, and 4) run and record no less than five trials per skier type (skier vs. snowboarder).

Homework: There is no science homework during the weekend.