G6 Week 11

Last week in science!

Monday, November 12th

Today in science: How can we transform the photos we’ve taken of specimens we’ve seen under the microscope into diagrams from which we can learn new things? Answer: We can use photo editing software already built into Google Documents to add labels and arrows to our photographs. An example of one A period student’s banana cell photograph–Jenny B.–can be seen below (this is at 100x magnification).

By clicking on this image, you can open it up in another window and make it bigger.

To begin transforming this photo into a useful diagram, we performed the following operations in class today:

1. Open Google Drive (either with the iPad App or, if using a laptop, through your TASIS Gmail homepage).
2. Create a folder named “Science 6”
3. Create a document in the Science 6 folder named “00A – Banana cell diagram
4. Using the Insert menu, choose Insert > Drawing.
5. When the drawing box pops up, choose the Image icon–this will allow you to choose the photograph of the banana cell that you will then transform into a labelled diagram.
6. Choose “Save & Close

Tomorrow, we will learn how to further edit and label this photograph.

Homework: Dr. M has asked students to write down what they ate for dinner tonight. This should be done on a piece of lined paper. Dr. M would also like to know (approximate) quantities. For example, “1 small glass of milk,” “1 small mixed salad,” “1 serving of spaghetti with tomato sauce,” “1 piece of chocolate cake, ” etc.

Tuesday, November 13th

Today in science: After writing down and submitting a record of what they ate for breakfast this morning, we turned our class attention back to the exercise started in yesterday’s class. After a few technical difficulties were overcome, by the end of the period, most students were successfully able to insert an image of a banana cell into their Google Document that can be both edited and labeled. The first thing students did to their image is ‘crop‘ it so that most of the unnecessary areas were removed from the photo. Students were then shown how to resize their image (using the active corners) and center it within the viewer. Before leaving the classroom, Dr. M asked students to share their Google Document with him by using the “Share” feature and entering his email address.

Homework: Dr. M has again asked students to write down what they ate for dinner tonight. This should be done on a piece of lined paper. Dr. M would also like to know (approximate) quantities. For example, “1 small glass of milk,” “1 small mixed salad,” “1 serving of spaghetti with tomato sauce,” “1 piece of chocolate cake, ” etc.

Wednesday, November 14th

Today in science: After a rocky start to the lesson due to some, ahem, unwelcome student behavior(s) at the beginning of class, we returned to our goal of creating an educational diagram from a photo made from one of our banana cell slides. During the lesson, we learned how to make (and format) text boxes and lines. By the end of the lesson, we had learned and practiced all of the skills needed to make the diagram shown below.

By clicking on this image, you can open it up in another window and make it bigger.

Thursday, November 15th

Today in science: To practice the skills we learned in yesterday’s science class. Dr. Merritt asked students to create two new cell diagrams–one animal cell and one plant cell–within the SAME Google Document that contains the banana cell digram. The photographs and the key information to include in the two new diagrams is listed below.

Plant Cell – Elodea cell image
Common name: Canadian waterweed
Scientific name: Elodea canadensis
Specimen: leaf cell
Stain: none
Magnification: 400x

Animal Cell – Human cheek cell
Common name: Human
Scientific name: Homo sapiens
Specimen: cheek cell
Stain: methylene blue
Magnification: 400x

Once you have cropped the image and inserted both the title and additional information text boxes, Dr. M will then tell you what parts of the two cells he would like you to identify by adding both lines and text.

Homework: To be determined…

Friday, November 16th

Today in science: Unfortunately, A period science class does not meet on Fridays. 😦

Homework: 

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