G6 Week 17

Last week in science!

Monday, January 14th

Today in science: Continuing our work from last week, the two main themes for today’s lesson were “data representation” and “data transformation.” Today, Dr. M showed students a few rules for making more scientific bar graphs. These rules, which Dr. M illustrated on the whiteboard with his own bar graph, are summarized below:

1. Like data tables, bar graphs must have a sentence-like title placed at the top (above) the graph.
2. Like data tables, all axes and bars must be made with a ruler (or straight edge).
3. The width of the bars must be uniform (equal to each other).
4. There should be empty/white space in between each bar and the width of the bars should be uniform (equal to each other).
5. The X- and Y-axes must have precise, but informative, labels. This information in these labels should also be included in the title. 

Homework: Students have been asked to complete a 2nd bar graph before coming to Tuesday’s science class. Instead of dividing the items they consumed for breakfast into “solids” and “liquids,” however, students have been asked to invent a new way of classifying their breakfast items before putting them onto a new bar graph. As in the first bar graph, students have been asked to use colors in their bar graph to show their new system of classification.

Tuesday, January 15th

Today in science: Continuing our work with student meal data, the two main themes for today’s lesson were “data representation” and “data transformation.” Today, Dr. M showed students bar graphs made by previous students. These bar graphs were used to help students see good, and not-so-good, examples of scientific bar graphs.

Homework: Students have been asked to complete ONE data table and ONE bar graph before coming to Thursday’s science class. Students have been asked to…

1) Organize 5 days of dinner (meal) data in the form of a data table made according to Dr. Merritt’s rules for making more scientific data tables.

2) Invent a way of classifying their dinner items by putting them into categories of their choosing (e.g., warm dishes vs. cold dishes OR meat-containing items vs. non-meat containing items).

3) Put their dinner items into a properly constructed bar graph (see Monday, January 14th) that is based on their categories.

Wednesday, January 16th

Today in science: Continuing our work with student meal data, the two main themes for today’s lesson were “data representation” and “data transformation.” Today, Dr. M showed an example of what the dinner bar graph (which is tomorrow’s homework) might look like. Students were then asked to create a data table like the one seen in this Google Document. The “Investigating Acidic Foods” data table marks the beginning of a new unit, the Acids & Alkalis unit.

Homework: Students have been asked to complete ONE data table and ONE bar graph before coming to Thursday’s science class. Students have been asked to…

1) Organize 5 days of dinner (meal) data in the form of a data table made according to Dr. Merritt’s rules for making more scientific data tables.

2) Invent a way of classifying their dinner items by putting them into categories of their choosing (e.g., warm dishes vs. cold dishes OR meat-containing items vs. non-meat containing items).

3) Put their dinner items into a properly constructed bar graph (see Monday, January 14th) that is based on their categories.

Thursday, January 17th

Today in science: The main theme for today’s lesson was “laboratory safety.” After submitting their homework, students created a new reference page in the back of their lab notebooks in which they drew and labelled eight hazard symbols. Many, but not all of these eight symbols will be seen in this and other TASIS science classes. The presentation shown to students, and from which they were asked to create their drawings, can be seen below:

Homework: There is no weekend science homework.

Friday, January 18th

Today in science: Unfortunately, A period science does not meet on Fridays. 😦

Homework: —

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