G7 Week 01 – S2

Last week in science!

Lesson 1 – Monday, January 25th

Today in science: After recording today’s Mars surface temperature data, students were given their final in-class work day to complete their solar system (distance) model. By the start of their next science lesson, the expectation is that students will have securely fastened their 13 heavenly bodies to the correct positions on their 5 meter string. The distances should reflect scaled distances calculated from the “Planet Distance Chart” (which was assigned  to each student in the Google Science Classroom).

Homework: Complete solar system model.

Lesson 2 – Tues/Wed, January 26-27th

Today in science: After recording today’s Mars surface temperature data, students were asked to consider the journey of the Voyager 1 and 2 deep space probes that were launched by NASA back in 1977. This video summarizes their (ongoing!) story…

After that, the lesson took a couple of different turns depending on the period. One direction taken by both C period and H period, however, was about life cycle of stars such as our sun. This video summarizes what we discussed in class…

And these two videos take the in-class star discussion a step further for those students that are interested: white and black dwarfs and red dwarfs.

Homework: Only students who have not yet completed their solar system model, which was due today, have homework tonight.

Lesson 3 – Wed/Thurs, January 27th-28th

Today in science: After recording today’s Mars surface temperature data, students were invited to send their name to Mars!!! After doing that, students were broken up into their LEGO Space Challenge teams and assigned their first task: to program their Roverbot so that it can successfully establish a ‘comms’ link with Earth. This involved learning how to link their Roverbot to a school iPad (or personal laptop) and getting familiar with the ‘block’ programming language used by the Roverbot, which is not so different from their coding work in Python with Turtle!

Remote learning students were given a different task, which involves making a series of educational videos to show their in-person classmates how impact craters are formed on Mars (recall that the Mars Perseverance rover is scheduled to land on February 18 in an impact crater called Jezero Crater).

Homework: There is no science homework tonight.

Lesson 4 – Friday, January 29th

Today in science: After recording today’s Mars surface temperature data, students were asked to continue working in their (new) teams on their six LEGO Space Challenges and programming their Roverbots.

For those students working remotely, they began working on their instructional video, which now has its own resource library in the Google Science Classroom.

Homework: There is no science homework this weekend.