G7 Week 03

Last week in science!

Monday, September 16th (no H period)

B period: Students were asked to begin filling in their first pre-labelled Table of Contents page with last week’s weeLAB Practice activities: Translation and Explication. Students were also asked to asked to begin tonight’s homework (see below) in class. Some, but not all students, completed the homework before leaving class.

Homework (B): Students were asked to spend 20 minutes at home combining their translated definition of a “banana” WITH their explicated definition of “tropical fruit.” The combination of these two definitions form a new “Explicated definition” of a banana, which should be recorded in the Lab Notebook with the title, “Explicated definition,” and enclosed in a neat drawn box/rectangle. Finally, students should count the total number of words in this new, explicated definition and record that number somewhere underneath the box.

C period: Students were asked to begin filling in their first pre-labelled Table of Contents page with last week’s weeLAB Practice activities: Translation and Explication. Students were then asked to listen to a short presentation by Dr. Merritt at the whiteboard, in which he explained how scientists name all of the known living organisms on Earth.

Homework (C): There is no science homework tonight for C period students. 

Tuesday, September 17th (no H period)

B period: After glueing a paper copy of the weeLAB Flowchart into the backs of their Lab Notebooks (somewhere near the “Dr. Merritt’s Rules & Guidelines” page), students learned how scientists classify all of the (known) living organisms on Earth. Using their electronic devices, students were then asked to search the Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and species of the banana. B period students should remember that it’s possible that scientists might not routinely make use one (or two) of the major classification categories when classifying plants. If you cannot, for example, find a Phylum (or Class) for bananas, then you can leave that entry blank for now.

Homework (B): Using internet sites such as Wikipedia (or other trustworthy Encyclopedia-like sites), students have been asked to find the the Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and species assigned to the banana. This work should be done in the Lab Notebook in a section clearly labelled, “Practice weeLAB – Classification.”

C period: After glueing a paper copy of the weeLAB Flowchart into the backs of their Lab Notebooks (somewhere near the “Dr. Merritt’s Rules & Guidelines” page), students were asked to research how scientists classify humans according to the Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and species system, students were then asked to research how scientists classify wolves–and, in particular, arctic wolves. The results of these mini-research exercises can be viewed in the Notes Portal. Finally, Dr. M gave students approximately 10 minutes to begin working on tonight’s homework (see below). C period students should remember that it’s possible that scientists might not routinely make use one (or two) of the major classification categories when classifying plants. If you cannot, for example, find a Phylum (or Class) for bananas, then you can leave that entry blank for now.

Homework (C): Using internet sites such as Wikipedia (or other trustworthy Encyclopedia-like sites), students have been asked to find the the Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and species assigned to the banana. This work should be done in the Lab Notebook in a section clearly labelled, “Practice weeLAB – Classification.”

Wednesday, September 18th

H period: After glueing a paper copy of the weeLAB Flowchart into the backs of their Lab Notebooks (somewhere near the “Dr. Merritt’s Rules & Guidelines” page), students were introduced to scientific classification by using examples such as humans (Homo sapiens) and wolves (Canis lupus).

Homework (H): Using internet sites such as Wikipedia (or other trustworthy Encyclopedia-like sites), students have been asked to find the the Domain, Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, and species assigned to the banana. This work should be done in the Lab Notebook in a section clearly labelled, “Practice weeLAB – Classification.” Students should remember that it’s possible that scientists might not routinely make use one (or two) of the major classification categories when classifying plants. If you cannot, for example, find a Phylum (or Class) for bananas, then you can leave that entry blank for now.

B & C period: After reviewing the scientific classification of wolves, humans, and bananas, the results of which can be seen in the Notes Portal, students were then asked to classify other organisms–mostly animals–of their choice. After successfully classifying the organism, Dr. Merritt began asking students to ‘unpack’ certain classification categories so that students could glean important information about the body plan (e.g., a hard, external skeleton), dietary preferences (e.g., meat eater), and/or reproductive strategies (e.g., gives birth to live young) of each organism. Upon doing so, students could then begin seeing similarities and differences between their chosen organisms.

Homework (B & C): There is no science homework tonight.

Thursday, September 19th (no C period)

H period: After reviewing the scientific classification of both humans and wolves, the results of which can be seen in the Notes Portal, students were then asked to classify other organisms–mostly animals–of their choice. After successfully classifying the organism, Dr. Merritt began asking students to ‘unpack’ certain classification categories so that students could glean important information about the body plan (e.g., a hard, external skeleton), dietary preferences (e.g., meat eater), and/or reproductive strategies (e.g., gives birth to live young) of each organism. Upon doing so, students could then begin seeing similarities and differences between their chosen organisms.

Homework (H): There is no science homework tonight.

B period: After being invited to taste a number of different raw fruits and vegetables left over from Dr. Merritt’s Grade 6 science lesson, students were able to correct last night’s homework assignment–the Banana classification exercise–with Dr. M’s answer key (see the 18-19 September entry in the Notes Portal).

Homework (B): Dr. Merritt has asked all B period students to spend 20 minutes attempting to combine what we learned when adding to the Banana classification notes near the end of Thursday’s class, which can be accessed through the Notes Portal, with the EXPLICATED definition of the banana already found in their Lab Notebooks. Although some students may indeed complete this task in 20 minutes, Dr. Merritt is NOT asking students to finish this new ‘CLASSIFIED’ definition of a banana. He would, however, like students to spend 20 high-quality minutes working on this task. This work should be treated as a first draft and NOT be put into the Lab Notebook. It should be written on a separate piece of lined paper.

Friday, September 20th (no B period)

C & H period: In support of the TASIS Climate Awareness Day initiative, today’s science lesson was oriented toward the following question: One million years from now, what objects will others find in the geological record that will come to define human civilization during the period from, say, 1800-2200 A.D?

Homework (C & H): There is no weekend science homework.