G7 Week 06 – S2

Last week in science!

Monday, March 4th (Day 49)

Today in science: After refreshing students as to how their semester science grade is determined (5% Daily, 10% Homework, 10% Classwork, 10% Quizzes, 10% Tests, 15% Formal Lab Reports, 20% Lab Notebook, 20% Projects), Dr. M showed each class a list of students’ current status on two yet-to-be-completed projects: the “Life of a Brassica flower” and “Brassica Growth Table” projects. Both of these projects take the form of a shared Google Document. Dr. M also asked students to update their Lab Notebooks in preparation for an upcoming Lab Notebook check. Finally, after briefly discussing a new ‘stippling’ drawing technique for the Pistil dissection, students had time in which to begin addressing any unfinished work from the class activities occurring in the week (or two) before the Winter Adventure.

Homework: During Monday’s lesson, students were asked to print their 5 best pistil dissection photos–which were taken in class on Friday, February 22–and to glue (or tape) them into their Lab Notebook by the start of THURSDAY’S lesson (March 7). The 5 photos can be in color OR black and white. The 5 photos needed are the ones described in class and in the Lab Notebook:

1. Unopened pistil
2. Opened pistil, Side A
3. Opened pistil, Side B
4. Unopened ovule (magnified)
5. Extracted embryo (magnified)

Tuesday-Wednesday, March 5th (Day 50-51)

Today in science: After making announcements about some upcoming assignment deadlines (see Homework section below), Dr. M asked students to try making their first stippling drawing of a single, fresh bay (laurel) leaf taken from the tree outside of the science lab. Tips, strategies, and suggestions were offered by Dr. M so as to increase student success when experimenting this drawing technique. Remember, this is the technique that students will use when doing their pistil dissection drawings on Thursday.

Example A

Dr. M’s unfinished example of the stippling technique with a bay laurel leaf.

Example B

A finished example (NOT Dr. M’s work!) of the stippling technique with a peanut.

Homework: There are a couple of homework assignments to consider working on over the next two nights:

1. DUE THURSDAY: During Monday’s lesson, students were asked to print their 5 best pistil dissection photos–which were taken in class on Friday, February 22–and to glue (or tape) them into their Lab Notebook by the start of THURSDAY’S lesson (March 7). The 5 photos can be in color OR black and white.

2. DUE FRIDAY: During Tuesday/Wednesday’s lesson, students were asked to have all of their Brassica rapa height data entered into the Google Document they first created (and shared with Dr. Merritt) back on Feb. 19-20. It is expected that students have approximately 36-37 days worth of height data in their data table for anywhere between 1-4 Brassica plants.

Thursday, March 6th (Day 52)

Today in science: After checking in today’s homework assignment (pasting 5 pistil dissection photographs into their lab notebooks), Dr. M reminded students of the homework assignment that is due tomorrow (completing their Brassica Growth Tables). He then introduced three more drawing techniques used by scientists to create realistic representations of observed objects. A basic introduction to these techniques can be viewed in the short video included below.

In the 45 minutes of remaining class time, students were asked to begin making drawings from the photos taken during their pistil dissection. Students could choose from any of the four drawing techniques: hatching, cross hatching, random scribbling, or stippling.

Homework: Students have been asked to have all of their Brassica rapa height data entered into a Google Document they first created (and shared with Dr. Merritt) back on Feb. 19/20. By the start of tomorrow’s lesson, it is expected that students will have approximately 36-37 days worth of height data included in their data table for anywhere between 1-4 Brassica plants.

Friday, March 7th (Day 53)

Today in science: Students had nearly the entire class period to work on completing and/or polishing up any of the assignments listed below. Dr. M made himself available to students for the entire period to offer help, support, encouragement, suggestions, advice, critique, laughter…anything!

1. Flower Dissection (in lab notebook – should have been finished before Winter Adventure)

2. Brassica Growth Table (a shared Google Document – DUE today!)

3. Quiz #5 – Flower Structure Functions (Dr. M asked students to put their graded Quiz #5 in their Classroom Science Binders, but also offered a re-take option for those who are/were unhappy with their score).

4. Pistil Dissection (in lab notebook – DUE Monday) – students struggling to label their photos or drawings should find the following links to be helpful/useful:

– A handout showing the parts of the pistil including the stigma, style, ovary, and ovules.

– A handout showing the parts of the embryo (baby plant), but don’t be fooled by the “seed coat,” which is labelled in the first (left side) image in this handout. The embryo you extracted from your ovule did not yet have a seed coat–as we will see when we open our pistils next week, the outside ‘skin’ of the soft, greenish ovules is actually what eventually becomes a dry, red-brown colored seed coat.

Homework: By the start of Monday’s lesson, students are expected to have completed their Pistil Dissection drawings in their Lab Notebooks. It was discussed in class (and written on the whiteboard), that students must label their drawings with the following vocabulary words: PISTIL, STIGMA, STYLE, OVARY, OVULE, EMBRYO, COTYLEDONS, RADICLE, HYPOCOTYL. Students can label either their drawing OR their original pictures–whichever shows the part with the most clarity/accuracy. Links to help students correctly/accurate label their pistil drawings can be accessed above.

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