G7 Week 18

Friday, January 26th – End of Semester 1

Today in science: Using the records found in their WFP Digital Journals, F & G period students were asked to identify five ‘firsts’ on their line graphs. These five events were best estimates of the following moments in the plants’ lives:

1: The first day on which the cotyledons were visible.
2: The first day on which a true leaf was visible.
3: The first day on which a unopened flower (bud) was visible.
4: The first day on which a opened flower was visible.
5: The first day on which a mature pistil was visible.

Homework: There is no science homework this weekend.

Thursday, January 25th

A period: Students continued working on their line graph paragraphs today.

F & G period: After checking in their line graphs with Dr. Merritt, students began reading the ‘story’ told by the line in the graph. To do so, Dr. M asked students to think about the line as consisting of events (or ‘chapters’) separated by a noticeable change in the steepness of the line. After identifying the most distinctive chapters, students were asked to calculate the rate of growth for each chapter (rate of growth (cm/day) = change in height divided by the change in time). Near the end of the class period, Dr. M showed students two ways in which line graphs can be use to make useful predictions.

Homework: Dr. Merritt would like ALL of his F & G period students to print ONE MORE copy of their line graphs to bring to Thursday’s science class. (Any student who did not print a copy for Thursday’s class should thus bring TWO printed copies to Friday’s class.) There are MORE stories to be told in these line graphs and having another printed copy that has no writing on it will help us see these stories much more clearly and accurately. Don’t forget to add a line connecting your data points with a ruler and pen/pencil.

Wednesday, January 24th

A period: After checking in their line graphs with Dr. Merritt, students began reading the ‘story’ told by the line in the graph. To do so, Dr. M asked students to think about the line as consisting of events (or ‘chapters’) separated by a noticeable change in the steepness of the line. After identifying the most distinctive chapters, students were asked to calculate the rate of growth for each chapter (rate of growth (cm/day) = change in height divided by the change in time). Near the end of the class period, Dr. M showed students two ways in which line graphs can be use to make useful predictions.

Homework: Dr. Merritt would like ALL of his A period students to print ONE MORE copy of their line graphs to bring to Thursday’s science class. (Any student who did not print a copy for Wednesday’s class should thus bring TWO printed copies to Thursday’s class.) There are MORE stories to be told in these line graphs and having another printed copy that has no writing on it will help us see these stories much more clearly and accurately. Don’t forget to add a line connecting your data points with a ruler and pen/pencil.

G period: For today’s class, students should use the Tuesday, January 23rd entry below.

Homework: G period students have been asked to print one copy of their line graph–in either color or black and white, it doesn’t matter–before their next science class. IT IS OK IF THE PRINTED LINE GRAPH CONTAINS NO LINES, ONLY POINTS. If this happens, lines connecting the data points can be added AFTER printing by simply drawing them with a pen (or pencil) and a ruler.

Tuesday, January 23rd

Today in science: In class, students were asked to create a simple data table from the plant height data found within their WFP Growth Logs (Google Doc). An example of one of these data tables can be seen below.

Students were then shown how to use the “Create a Graph” website (https://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/) to create a line graph from this data. Although we ran into a scaling problem near the end of the class period, fortunately, we were able to solve the issue before leaving class. Here is an example of a what a completed line graph might look like after fixing the scaling problem…

Homework: Students have been asked to print one copy of their line graph–in either color or black and white, it doesn’t matter–before their next science class. IT IS OK IF THE PRINTED LINE GRAPH CONTAINS NO LINES, ONLY POINTS. If this happens, lines connecting the data points can be added AFTER printing by simply drawing them with a pen (or pencil) and a ruler.

Monday, January 22nd

Today in science: Many students were absent from school today, but those that were in class continued watching scenes from a BBC Earth video, The Private Lives of Plants, which aims to show some of the ingenious ways in which plants not only gather the raw materials needed to perform photosynthesis, but also defend their nutritious, highly edible structures from grazing animals such as insects and mammals. Special mention was made by Dr. Merritt today of the idea of “adaptation” (noun) and “to adapt” (verb). More specifically, we discussed instances in the video in which plants could be seen as having adapted to specific conditions within their surrounding environment.

Homework: There is no science homework tonight.

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