Expectations-Based

MARKING SCHEMES
Expectations-based | Credit-based


Dr. Merritt typically uses a five-category classification system of expectations for all revisable assignments:

EE = exceeds expectations
ME = meets expectations
AE = approaches expectations
BE = below expectations
WBE = well below expectations


How does one earn “Exceeds Expectations” on a revisable assignment?

The most straightforward answer to this question is: “The quality of the submitted assignment must exceed the expectations of the teacher.” Yes, but what does that mean?

One thing this means is that students should make use of available assignment rubrics for it is within the very text of the rubrics themselves that the teacher’s most explicit explanation(s) of the assignment expectations are listed. If an assignment rubric is not available, then students should listen carefully to the verbal instructions given by the teacher, as well as read any written instructions included with the assignment itself.

Another thing this means is that students should follow the seven key criteria for credit-based work. For your benefit and convenience, these seven key criteria are listed below.

1) Your assignment is LABELLED correctly. This means that your STUDENT # and the DATE (either the date started or data completed) is visible at the top, right hand corner of the first page.

2) Your assignment is TITLED correctly. This means that a proper ASSIGNMENT TITLE is visible at the TOP of the first page. A ‘proper’ title will be a) brief, b) informative, c) accurate, and d) centered. Your assignment title should also include the assignment type in the title (e.g., Homework, Classwork, Project, Special Writing Assignment, Lab Notebook, etc.)

3) Your assignment is COMPLETED, to the best of your ability. This means that you have completed as much of the assignment as you were capable of finishing. If there are unanswered questions or unperformed tasks, there should be visible EVIDENCE present to show that you gave the question or task your best effort.

4) Your assignment is LEGIBLE, which means READABLE. This means that your teacher can understand all of the WORDS, NUMBERS, and SYMBOLS (including lines and other shapes) included in your assignment.

5) Your assignment is on a type of paper that is WELL-SUITED to the task. This means that, for example, a graphing assignment is completed on GRAPHING paper and a writing assignment is complete on RULED, LINED paper.

6) Your assignment is in a pen, pencil, or ink color that is WELL-SUITED to the task. This means that, for example, words, phrases, and sentences should almost always be written in DARK pencil or BLUE or BLACK pen ink. If typed, the font COLOR should be black, the font SIZE should be 12-pt., and the font TYPE should be either Times New Roman, Arial, or Calibri.

7) Your assignment is in an ACCEPTABLE physical condition. This means that, for example, multiple papers should be STAPLED at the top, left-hand corner. Papers should not be excessively WRINKLED, TORN, or CRUMPLEDAll spiral-bound ‘frizzled’ edges have been REMOVEDPapers should not be WET or DAMP.

Finally, every time you turn in an assignment for grading/marking, feedback, and/or evaluation, Dr. Merritt would like to you to consider FIVE additional statements regarding ‘high quality’ work. In addition to the seven key criteria listed above, whenever possible, high quality work in this science class tries to realize (embody) the following characteristics:

1) clarity, precision, and specificity in all expressed thoughts and ideas.

2) critical thinking and deep understanding.

3) integrityhonesty, and humility.

4) creativitypassion, and wisdom.

5) a sense of adventure.


Does Dr. Merritt accept “late” expectations-based assignments?

The most direct answer to this question is: “Yes, he does.” However, a student’s ability to revise an expectations-based assignment depends on his/her ability to submit the assignment in a timely manner. For example, students submitting their assignment on or before a due date set by the teacher automatically become eligible to revise their assignment if they are not satisfied by their initial mark/grade. This opportunity is not extended, however, to students who submit their assessments in either an almost timely or untimely manner.

All science students should spend time familiarizing themselves with the ‘timeliness’ rules of assignments in the sections that follow.


What is a “timely” assignment?

A TIMELY (or ‘on-time’) assignment [Link needs updating: August 2016] is any assignment handed in on or before a due date set by the teacher. Timely assignments can receive up to 100% of the maximum point value of the assignment. Students can choose to revise and resubmit timely assignment for improved an improved grade/mark one time.

– Click HERE [Link needs updating: August 2016] to access the Google Sheet containing the Marking Scheme for Timely Assessments for different point values.


What is an “almost timely” assignment?

An ALMOST TIMELY assignment [Link needs updating: August 2016] is any assignment handed in one class day after a due date set by the teacher (note: class days do not include Saturdays & Sundays). Almost timely assignments can receive up to 97.5% of the maximum point value of the assignment. Students cannot revise and resubmit almost timely assignments for improved marks and must complete and submit an MIA (Missing In Action) form on the original assignment due date if they want the assignment to be accepted as almost timely.

– Click HERE [Link needs updating: August 2016] to access the Google Sheet containing the Marking Scheme for Almost Timely Assignments for different point values.


What is an “untimely” assignment?

An UNTIMELY (or ‘late’) assignment [Link needs updating: August 2016] is any assignment handed in two or more class days after a due date set by the teacher (note: class days do not include Saturdays & Sundays). Untimely assignments can receive up to 80% of the maximum point value of the assignment. Students cannot revise and resubmit untimely assignments for improved marks and must complete and submit two MIA (Missing In Action) forms–Form A (link needed) on the due date of the original assignment and Form B on the day after (link needed)–if they want the assignment to be accepted for credit as untimely/late.

– Click HERE [Link needs updating: August 2016] to access the Google Sheet containing the Marking Scheme for Untimely Assignments for different point values.


Marking Scheme for English Language Learners and Other Students

In order to better assist and support the significant learning needs of students for whom science instruction in English is entirely (or recently) new, a special assignment revision scheme is available to them. EAL Beginning students, for example, can revise and resubmit most of their revisable assignment for improved marks up to two times. As is the case with language proficient students, this arrangement is dependent on whether or not the original assignment was submitted in a timely or untimely manner.

This special assignment revision scheme can also be extended to students receiving documented language-based support services at the TASIS LRC (Learning Resource Center) and students with other unique circumstances as agreed upon during a Teacher-Student-Parent meeting.

– Click HERE [Link needs updating: August 2016] to access the Google Sheet containing the Marking Scheme for Language Learners for different point values.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s